• WHAT IS TITLE 1?
    Title 1 is a federally funded program that serves millions of children in elementary schools across the United States. Children who participate in the Title I program do so because they are in need of extra academic support.  This extra assistance may last a few weeks, a few months, or the entire school year. The Title 1 teacher or paraprofessional works with a small group or individual on the classroom assignment or on other activities that reinforce classroom skills and concepts.

    HOW DOES A CHILD BECOME ELIGIBLE FOR TITLE 1?
    A child is recommended for Title 1 help based on a combination of the following data: district assessments, FAST data, classroom performance, grades, and teacher judgment.

    WHO PROVIDES THE EXTRA HELP?
    Licensed teachers and educational paraprofessionals provide supplemental services for Title 1 students under the direction of the classroom teacher.

    DOES TITLE 1 TAKE THE PLACE OF CLASSROOM INSTRUCTION?
    No, Title 1 help is intended to provide extra help, not take the place of classroom instruction.  A variety of materials, techniques and methods are used to supplement classroom instruction.  The goal of the instruction is to increase the understanding of concepts and the skills of the students.

    HOW LONG IS A CHILD SERVED BY TITLE 1?
    A child may receive Title 1 tutoring for either a short time or a longer time, depending on the needs of the child. The length of time depends on the child's rate of progress.  A child is no longer in the program once he/she:

    • Meets the objectives or goals listed on the district's educational plan or
    • Does not qualify for help based on test scores or grades or
    • Can do his/her classroom assignments without assistance.

    HOW CAN A PARENT HELP?
    You can help by staying informed about your child's progress in school – reading classroom newsletters, monitoring homework time, looking over papers brought home, encouraging extra practice in struggling areas. Be sure your child gets plenty of rest and a good breakfast to start the day. Good attendance is very important! Monitor the time your child spends watching TV, playing video games, and using tablet devices. Help him/her discover other forms of recreation. Provide a time and place to do homework. Spend time reading to your child. Your child is never too old to hear a good story. Be involved in your child's education.

    The greatest learning occurs when parents, students, and educators work together as a team.

     

Home School Compact

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